Marine and Environment

Environment new Marine Life: New Pacific eel is a 'living fossil', scientists say

New Pacific eel is a 'living fossil', scientists say
A new type of eel that inhabits an undersea cave in the Pacific Ocean has been dubbed a "living fossil" because of its primitive features.
It is so distinct, scientists created a new taxonomic family to describe its relationship to other eels.
The US-Palauan-Japanese team say the eel's features suggest it has a long and independent evolutionary history stretching back 200m years.
READ MORE & SEE THE VIDEO

New White Whale spotted in Australia...just amazing...you have to see the Photo of this Whale...

Fantastic Photo of a NEW White Whale from Down Under...

New White Whale spotted...

Courtesy By Alison Feeney-Hart
BBC News, Sydney

Migaloo has become something of a celebrity

A new white humpback has been sighted off Byron Bay on the east coast of Australia.
The newcomer, which was filmed by a television news helicopter, has excited marine scientists who think it may be related to Migaloo - to date, the only known all-white humpback whale.
Migaloo is somewhat of a celebrity down under. Why? "Because as far as we know, he is globally unique," said Professor Peter Harrison from the Whale Research Centre, Southern Cross University.
It now seems that Migaloo, (whose Aboriginal name means "white fellow") might have competition.

Although predominantly white, the new whale does have some black markings near its head and tail. So who is the newcomer?
A white calf was spotted with a normal humpback mother in Byron Bay two years ago. Experts say the new whale could be the offspring of Migaloo but further tests need to be carried out.
A record number of humpbacks have been spotted off the Australian coast this year on their annual migration north to their breeding grounds.
One thing scientists do agree on is that this second white whale has never been seen in these waters before...
more and the amazing photo @
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7519263.stm

Did You Know? Whales are 'cheetahs of the deep'

We have just received this very interesting information regarding this article from our friend and supporter Mr. Walter Ty, thanks Walter.

Whales are 'cheetahs of the deep'

A pilot whale was seen to surface with squid in its mouth Super-fast pilot whales have been observed sprinting after prey, likely to include giant squid.
The rapid pursuit has brought comparisons with the fleet-footed land predator, the cheetah.
The cetaceans even use the same, highly specialized hunting strategy that cheetahs use, scientists report in the Journal of Animal Ecology.
They say it gives the lie to our perception that deep sea whales are slow, energy-saving creatures... more on this fascinating story @
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7400788.stm

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LATE BREAKING NEWS! "The Pink Pearls of the Pacific"

Walter Ty has done it again...thanks so much...from what I have heard the spawning is over...you lucky divers who had been in Palau during this time. Maybe the visibility was not so great to see all the other marine life...but then the coral spawning is something not to be missed...natures gift to man and a reminder that we have to take care of our environment...ironically the month of April is suppose to be the green month...I guess Palau has both, above it is green and below during the spawning it is all pink.
What a contrast!
GD



© Gunther Deichmann - Is this what it looked like in Palau???
For some real images go to the link provided below...
this is only an artist impression.

The annual mass spawning of corals on the Palau archipelago in the western Pacific has occurred right on cue. With Sunday night's full moon, coral polyps let forth a huge swathe of sperm and egg, to seed the next generation.

The event was short-lived - only about 30 minutes - but so vast in its scale that it turned the sea water pink. Scientists from Palau, Australia and the UK are studying the practicality of collecting coral larvae to help restore damaged reefs elsewhere.

See what a mass spawning at Palau looks like (Reefvid.org)
As we got into the boat for our trip to Luke's reef, I admit I was not really expecting to see the mass spawning on the exact night of the full Moon. All the visiting scientists here thought it was more likely the reproductive extravaganza would happen the next evening or the following one - based on what had happened the last two years. The only person who seemed sure it would happen on cue was Steven Victor, the Palauan director of the Palau International Coral Reef Center. Local knowledge was spot on, as it turned out.
Almost as soon as the boat engine switched off, we got a sense that something might be brewing... you have to see and read the whole story...and images
@
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7358423.stm